Protecting the Environment During Armed Conflict

This report inventories and analyses the range of international laws that protect the environment during armed conflict. With a view to identifying the current gaps and weaknesses in this system, the authors examine the relevant provisions within four bodies of international law – international humanitarian law (IHL), international criminal law (ICL), international environmental law (IEL), and international human rights law (HRL). The report concludes with twelve concrete recommendations on ways to strengthen this legal framework and its enforcement.

How war debris could cause cancer

Could the mystery over how depleted uranium might cause genetic damage be closer to being solved? It may be, if a controversial claim by two researchers is right. They say that minute quantities of the material lodged in the body may kick out energetic electrons that mimic the effect of beta radiation. This, they argue, could explain how residues of depleted uranium scattered across former war zones could be increasing the risk of cancers and other problems among soldiers and local people.

Lebanon Post-Conflict Environmental Assessment (Source Unep)

Published in January 2007 by the United Nations Environment Programme.

No Evidence of Radioactive Residue in Lebanon (Source Unep)

Statement attributable to Achim Steiner, United Nations Under-Secretary General and UNEP Executive Director. Published on 7 November 2006.

NAIROBI, 7 November, 2006 – The fieldwork of the post conflict environmental assessment of Lebanon has been completed by a team from the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), which carried out its work in Lebanon from 30 September to 21 October 2006.

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